Meditation and Music Slow Cellular Aging

Mindfulness Combats Memory Loss




Anatoliy Karlyuk/Shutterstock.com

Meditating or listening to classical music altered biomarkers associated with cellular aging and Alzheimer’s disease in adults experiencing memory loss, according to a recent West Virginia University study. The 60 participants had subjective cognitive decline, including forgetting familiar names and losing objects, a condition that may be a preclinical stage of Alzheimer’s. For 12 minutes a day, they either listened to instrumental classical music or did a kirtan kriya meditation involving chanting, visualization and finger poses. After three months, all subjects had increases in a key beta amyloid peptide protective from Alzheimer’s, as well as better memory, mood, sleep and quality of life, while the meditation group experienced significantly better improvements. Activity in two chromosomal markers of cellular aging—telomere length and telomerase activity—increased for both groups, especially among those that practiced more frequently or started with lower cognitive scores. The improved biomarkers were maintained or even strengthened three months after the study ended.


This article appears in the March 2019 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Join in a Climate Strike Event

People have been conducting strikes as a method of demanding change for many years.

Sustainable Scrubbing

Cleaning the house shouldn’t be a health hazard, yet studies have linked many popular cleaning products to asthma and other respiratory ills, developmental problems in young children and breast cancer.

Cetacean Liberation

Canada’s Parliament recently passed legislation banning the practice of breeding and keeping whales, dolphins and porpoises in captivity.

Growing Pains

Cultivation throughout the U.S. is becoming more difficult because of unpredictable weather patterns, leading to higher prices and lowered productivity.

Cola Quandary

Vietnam is among the biggest contributors to plastic waste in the ocean, and Suntory Holdings, a giant Japanese beverage company, has joined its rivals Coca-Cola and Nestlé to encourage new recycling strategies to fend off such actions as the European Union’s move toward outlawing single-use plastic items.

Add your comment: